Diverse Christmas

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About This Item

It's the most wonderful, mutually inclusive time of year!
  • FREE SHIPPING in the USA
  • 100% Cotton Tees
  • The perfect gift that guarantees laughs!
  • Features & Details

    Men's & Women's Tees

    • Seamless rib at neck
    • Taped shoulder-to-shoulder
    • Double needle stitching
    • Tear-away label
    • Quarter-turned to eliminate center crease
    • 7/8” collar
    • Classic fit
    • The ULTIMATE cotton tee!
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    Hoodie

    • Heavyweight, durable fabric
    • 90% cotton/10% polyester blend
    • Ribbed cuffs and relaxed waistband to keep its shape
    • Low-pill fabric
    • Roomy front pouch pocket and hood
    • The ULTIMATE cotton hoodie!
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    Mug

    • Glossy, eye-catching print
    • Dishwasher friendly
    • High quality ceramic
    • Holds up to 12 oz. of liquid
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    Description

    The term multiculturalism has a range of meanings within the contexts of sociology, of political philosophy, and of colloquial use. In sociology and in everyday usage, it is a synonym for "ethnic pluralism", with the two terms often used interchangeably, for example, a cultural pluralism in which various ethnic groups collaborate and enter into a dialogue with one another without having to sacrifice their particular identities. It can describe a mixed ethnic community area where multiple cultural traditions exist (such as New York City) or a single country within which they do (such as Switzerland, Belgium or Russia). Groups associated with an aboriginal or autochthonous ethnic group and foreigner ethnic groups are often the focus. In reference to sociology, multiculturalism is the end-state of either a natural or artificial process (for example: legally-controlled immigration) and occurs on either a large national scale or on a smaller scale within a nation's communities. On a smaller scale this can occur artificially when a jurisdiction is established or expanded by amalgamating areas with two or more different cultures (e.g. French Canada and English Canada). On a large scale, it can occur as a result of either legal or illegal migration to and from different jurisdictions around the world (for example, Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain by Angles, Saxons and Jutes in the 5th century or the colonization of the Americas by Europeans, Africans and Asians since the 16th century). Multiculturalism as a political philosophy involves ideologies and policies which vary widely,[1] ranging from the advocacy of equal respect to the various cultures in a society,[citation needed] through policies of promoting the maintenance of cultural diversity,[citation needed] to policies in which people of various ethnic and religious groups are addressed by the authorities as defined by the group to which they belong.[2][3] Multiculturalism that promotes maintaining the distinctiveness of multiple cultures is often contrasted[by whom?] to other settlement policies such as social integration, cultural assimilation and racial segregation. Multiculturalism has been described as a "salad bowl" and as a "cultural mosaic"[4] - in contrast to a melting pot.[5] Two different and seemingly inconsistent strategies have developed through different government policies and strategies. The first focuses on interaction and communication between different cultures; this approach is also often known[by whom?] as interculturalism. The second centers on diversity and cultural uniqueness, which can sometimes[quantify]result in intercultural competition over jobs (among other things) and may lead to ethnic conflict.[6][7] Discussions surrounding the issue of cultural isolation may address the ghettoization of a culture within a nation and the protection of the cultural attributes of an area or of a nation. Proponents of government policies often claim that artificial, government-guided protections also contribute to global cultural diversity.[8][not in citation given][9][need quotation to verify] The second approach to multiculturalist policy-making maintains that they[who?]avoid presenting any specific ethnic, religious, or cultural community values as central.

    Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,[8][9] observed primarily on December 25[4][10][11] as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.[2][12][13] A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night;[14] in some traditions, Christmastide includes an octave.[15]Christmas Day is a public holiday in many of the world's nations,[16][17][18] is celebrated religiously by a majority of Christians,[19]as well as culturally by many non-Christians,[1][20] and forms an integral part of the holiday season centered around it. The traditional Christmas narrative, the Nativity of Jesus, delineated in the New Testament says that Jesus was born in Bethlehem, in accordance with messianic prophecies.[21] When Joseph and Mary arrived in the city, the inn had no room and so they were offered a stable where the Christ Child was soon born, with angels proclaiming this news to shepherds who then further disseminated the information.[22] Although the month and date of Jesus' birth are unknown, by the early-to-mid fourth century the Western Christian Church had placed Christmas on December 25,[23] a date that was later adopted in the East.[24][25] Today, most Christians celebrate on December 25 in the Gregorian calendar, which has been adopted almost universally in the civil calendars used in countries throughout the world. However, some Eastern Christian Churches celebrate Christmas on December 25 of the older Julian calendar, which currently corresponds to January 7 in the Gregorian calendar, the day after the Western Christian Church celebrates the Epiphany. This is not a disagreement over the date of Christmas as such, but rather a preference of which calendar should be used to determine the day that is December 25. Moreover, for Christians, the belief that God came into the world in the form of man to atone for the sins of humanity, rather than the exact birth date, is considered to be the primary purpose in celebrating Christmas.[26][27][28][29] The celebratory customs associated in various countries with Christmas have a mix of pre-Christian, Christian, and secularthemes and origins.[30] Popular modern customs of the holiday include gift giving, completing an Advent calendar or Advent wreath, Christmas music and caroling, lighting a Christingle, viewing a Nativity play, an exchange of Christmas cards, church services, a special meal, pulling Christmas crackers and the display of various Christmas decorations, including Christmas trees, Christmas lights, nativity scenes, garlands, wreaths, mistletoe, and holly. In addition, several closely related and often interchangeable figures, known as Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nicholas, and Christkind, are associated with bringing gifts to children during the Christmas season and have their own body of traditions and lore.[31] Because gift-giving and many other aspects of the Christmas festival involve heightened economic activity, the holiday has become a significant event and a key sales period for retailers and businesses. The economic impact of Christmas has grown steadily over the past few centuries in many regions of the world.

    With a wide variety of funny original t-shirt designs – including 4xl tees for men and 4xl tees for women - Bag Bad Tees T Shirts has some of the funniest novelty t-shirts ever. We also have hilarious hoodies and witty coffee mugs that you gotta have. For the most hysterical graphic tees on the planet, visit BigBadTees.com. Check back often – we have new funny shirts every week!

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